The Local Towns & Villages

Lake District Towns & Villages

Historic features in the Lake District

Lingmoor Guest House is located in the delightful village of Windermere. Our central location means it is ideally located for exploring the many charming Lake District towns. There are timeless places to visit in The Lake District when enjoying a short break, all of them with their own unique identity, here’s our introduction to some of the highlights.

Windermere...
A short break in Windermere offers visitors a wealth of individual shops, bars, restaurants and cinema. The Old Laundry Theatre stages many fine productions to cover all tastes. Stroll round the north end of the village where the Lighthouse offers outside seating to enjoy your coffee and while away the time. Further down the street you will find Ashworths, who sell some very fine cheese and other Lakeland treats. There are some fine eating places in the village, Wicked and Francine’s are worth a visit.

Stroll down to Bowness–on-Windermere to the lake and pick up a boat, there are three different types of cruises to take, from just a trip round a small part of the lake and longer cruises to Ambleside or Lakeside.

Coniston...
Coniston is a beautiful, tranquil village with walks through the ancient copper mining districts to the top of Coniston Old Man with its amazing view of the lake, the third largest of all the lakes. Wander around the delightful village and its unique shops, tea shops or traditional pubs or cruise on conisotn on the take the elegant Victorian Steam Yacht Gondola owned by the National Trust, or take the Coniston Launch. Coniston is home to Brantwood: home of John Ruskin the Victorian philosopher who declared the view over the lake to ‘The Old Man of Coniston’ as ‘the best in all of England’. Brantwood is located on the East side of Coniston and on a nice day is a lovely walk.

Hawkshead...
A few miles from Windermere is the delightful village of Hawkshead, nestled in the beautiful vale of Esthwaite. This tiny village located at the northern tip of Esthwaite Water (one of the most nutrient-rich of all the lakes and subsequently home to many fish and popular with fishermen) is a perfect day out on any short break. Its famous whitewashed buildings and Lakeland backdrop make this village delightful for exploring the many alleyways, squares, unique shops; including a great delicatessen. Sample some local ale in one of the charming pubs or afternoon tea in a traditional tea rooms. Steeped in history this village has many old buildings and churches and has important literary connections to William Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter. The surrounding countryside offers some pleasant walks and nearby Grizedale Forest is a must visit for any short break.

Grasmere...
This charming village most famous for its links to William Wordsworth is easily visited from Lingmoor Guest House either by car or by direct bus route from Windermere bus station. Lying to the north of Grasmere lake, the village offers visitors an array of specialist shops, none more famous than Sarah Nelson’s Grasmere Gingerbread shop. The aroma of this delicious Lakeland delicacy, still made to the original 18th century recipe, floats through the village enticing visitors. The Gingerbread shop is located in a corner next to St Oswald’s Church where in its graveyard William Wordsworth’s final resting place can be found. Dove Cottage the delightful former home of Wordsworth can be found on the edge of the village and visitors can take a guided tour and see original furniture, portraits and possessions. A rewarding twenty minute walk along the old coffin path affords beautiful views and leads you to Rydal Mount, overlooking Rydal Water, described as Wordsworth’s most beloved home. The house contains many original pieces of furniture, personal effects of the Wordsworths and portraits, the gardens originally landscaped by Wordsworth still remain very close to his original design. For more information on William Wordsworth visit the Wordsworth page.

There is a very good garden centre in Grasmere that has a superb cafe and is reasonably priced. The area surrounding Grasmere abounds with delightful walks, whether a gentle stroll or a more challenging walk it has something for everyone. In August the village takes on a life of its own with Grasmere Sports taking place one of Lakeland’s most traditional events and not to be missed.

Ambleside...
You can travel to Ambleside by boat from Bowness on Windermere, alight at the north end of Lake Windermere and you can walk through Borrans Park or sit a while and admire the stunning view back down the lake. A short walk further and you can play pitch and putt or do some shopping, there are good outdoor walking shops and some very good tea shops, Lucy’s of Ambleside being a must. For the more energetic, there is a walk to the waterfall that is well worth the effort.

Keswick...
This market town remains unchanged for hundreds of years, it has a great sweet shop called Friars and an excellent whiskey shop for all you malt drinkers. The town is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts with many outdoor shops. The market is on a Wednesday and Saturday. Nearer to the water is a larger pitch and putt and some lovely gardens, which then lead to the Theatre and Derwent Water. Altogether, a good place to spend a day, the journey there will take you past some lovely waterfalls and Thirlmere reservoir, a perfect day out for any short break.

Kendal...
A large market town situated 7 miles south from Windermere with many shops, The Brewery Arts Centre, museums and the Quaker Tapestry centre and tea shop. Visit the local supermarket Booths where there is an Artisan food hall full of local produce. There are also good butchers on the market square where you can purchase good local meats. Stop for a coffee at Farrers and see how many types of tea and coffee you could take home or those with a sweet tooth visit the famous 1657 Chocolate House – a specialist and unique Lake District tourist attraction.

Ulverston Nestled between the Lakeland fells and Morecambe bay this quaint town has delightful cobbled streets, quirky independent shops, traditional pubs , selection of cafes and street market every Thursday and smaller market on Saturdays. On the edge of Ulverston is The Lakes Glass Centre including Cumbria Crystal and Heron Glass where you can watch glass being blown, look around the factory and the shop. Ulverston may more famously be known as the home of Stan Laurel, born in Argyl street and commemorated in the Laurel and Hardy museum. Also home to Maude Green, who was the mother of Bill Hayley of Bill Hayley and The Comets, a well recognised rock and roll band of the 1950’s. Ulverston is overlooked by the Hoad Monument situated on Hoad Hill high above the town. Erected in 1850 it commemorates Sir John Barrow who was born in Ulverston and was a founder member of the Royal Geographic Society and is a replica of the Third Eddystone Lighthouse. Normally open on Saturdays in summer (when the flag is flying), the top can be reached by 112 steps, with a magnificent 360 degree panorama of the Furness Peninsular, Morecambe Bay and the Southern Lake District Fells. Visit Ulverston in September and you can watch the legendary Ulverston Lantern Procession and during late November enjoy the sound of brass band and carol singers as the Dickensian Festival gets under way. It will really get you in the festive mood with lots of towns folk dressed in period costume and festive Christmas market.

With so many delightful towns and villages to explore it’s easy to see why The Lake District is a popular choice for short breaks. Lingmoor Guest House’s convenient central location and close proximity to Windermere bus and train station makes exploring the many Lake District towns and villages easy with or without a car.